Case Studies

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Protecting the power network from electrical faults

Electricity is transmitted at high voltages (HV) and reduced for domestic use by power transformers installed in HV substations. Many substations are located inside buildings in urban areas in reduced spaces. HV switchgear, such as circuit-breakers and disconnectors, are used to de-energise equipment to allow safe maintenance. ...

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Combating infections with advanced DNA sequencing

Resistance to antibiotic treatments are responsible for approximately 33,000 deaths a year in Europe and infectious diseases were the leading cause of death among children under five. This includes bacteria that have developed resistance to Carbapenems, considered drugs of ‘last resort’ for Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) infect...

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Quantitative measurements for nano-scale magnetic fields

The magnetic sensor market was €1.7 billion in 2019 and is estimated to reach €2.5 billion by 2025. Growth is anticipated to arise from an increase in consumer electronics, robotics, automated systems, and information technology. In these areas’ nano-scale structures with magnetic properties are used to decrease device size, in...

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A new standard in the field of small current measurements

Technological advances, such as low power devices, or micro and nanoelectronics in the semiconductor industry, have introduced the requirement for measurements of small currents of 1 nA and below. Measurements at this scale utilise instruments such as pico-ammeters which require accurate calibration, often in situ. To do this r...

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Seeing the light

The European Commission has identified optics as a ‘key enabling technology’ essential for supporting a wide range of advanced research and cutting-edge technical industries. ICT and healthcare applications are amongst those requiring more sensitive light measurements as existing approaches reach their physical limits. Photodio...

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Fingerprinting nuclear waste

A large proportion of nuclear power plant waste has minimal radioactive content, well below biologically hazardous levels, and once classified as ‘free release’ it can be sent for recycling. However, all nuclear waste is necessarily subject to strict regulations governing its release and the criteria for free release into the e...

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